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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 945 (some duplicates have been removed)
MSNBC
Dec 24, 2012 5:00am PST
dignity in our hands. blood springs forward as of this moment, now, now, now! >> abraham lincoln has asked to us work with him to accomplish the death of slavery. >> no one's ever been loved so much by the people. don't waste that power. >> this fight is for the united states of america. >> we choose to be born or are we fitted into the times we're born into? >>> welcome back to a special holiday edition of "morning joe." >> you're special. >> you should feel very special. >> enjoying your holidays? >> yeah, it great, all that togetherness. thank you for spending part of your morning with us. we're talking lincoln. >> wish the neighbors would leave already. >> are they over there still? >> yeah, they came over. >> do you know their names yet? >> not yet. i never met them. they're from -- hey neighbor. we let them in but -- >> hey, how are you, it's good to see you. then it's like i don't know your name. >> i'm going to buy them all tickets to my favorite movie of the year "lincoln," going to hand it to them on line, get them to unlock it. >> that's a good idea. >> this is a heck of a coinc
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 5:00pm EST
this and argue about it. i can see, okay, if it wasn't abraham lincoln who was likely to become president in 1860. i can get an answer. it almost certainly would have been william henry who was the secretary of state. that's great. i can go back and look at the memo he wrote to lincoln about what he wanted to do and what lincoln wanted to do and what was cone. i can get a good proxy for what might have happened if the ore would have gotten the job. measure what the impact of lincoln was. if you're thinking about individual impact, i don't think it makes any sents to say the person was here about decision was made therefore it's about them. if anybody would have made that same decision, it's not about them. japan attacks pearl harbor on december 7, 1941, franklin roosevelts has to decide if we are going to declare war on japan. we were going. >> no conceivable american politician would have declared war. >> no politician who would have become president. that's right. >> host: you pay particular attention to three presidents, thomas jefferson, abraham lincoln, you already mentioned and woodrow wils
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 6:45am EST
of abraham lincoln: a novel." professor carter, they are to premise in here that i want to get to that are historically inaccurate. number one, abraham lincoln survived the assassination of him, and abraham lincoln is impeached. where did you come up with this? >> i start by making clear that in spite of the title, i am a lincoln fan. this is not an argument on behalf of lincoln's impeachment. it's not a brief -- it's just a novel and for me as a fan and someone interested in history, what if lincoln had survived and what if, in my telling as political enemies, he had many including in his own party which would tend to forget, political enemies as late as 1865 were looking for way to get them out of the way. what if you tried to do it the impeachment process. >> but again, where did you come up with the idea? when did it occur to you that this might be a fun thing to do? >> i don't know when it decided to turn the novel. i remember when i was back in college, chatting with one of my professors after class one day, about what if lincoln had survived over the years a lot of peopl
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 8:30pm EST
states in 1862. is the second year the civil war and specifically reactions of president abraham lincoln. it's a little over an hour. [applause] >> the thank you very much. a wonderful crowd. thank you to regnery books, a real asset to our community here. with all these programs. i am glad to see my kids in the audience, who asked me to mention their names. henry, alice, abby, claire and my wife karen is here and my mother doris and many friends but also the basis as well. thank you all for coming out. i appreciate your time and interest. in "rise to greatness" i tell the story of the most eventful and perilous time in american history, 1862. as much as possible i tell it through the eyes of the man who guided the nation through the fire, abraham lincoln. i don't want to spoil the book for you, so let me just say that the year began with the american republic in grave danger. the union army was struggling to regrow virtually overnight from a few thousand men scattered across the continent, to more than half a billion. the inexperienced officers, the command of these were all volunteers w
PBS
Dec 23, 2012 6:30pm PST
. this is the story told in the beautiful motion picture "lincoln" starring daniel day lewis and sally field. the film presents the 16th president as an astute, capable pragmatist. >> shall we stop this bleeding? abolishing slavery settles the fate for millions now in bondage. and unborn millions to come. >> either the amendment or this confederate piece you cannot move forward. >> don't waste that power. >> only hundreds of thousands have died under your administration. >> we must cure ourselves of slavery. this amendment is that cure! >> god help us for trapping you in a marriage that's only ever given you free. >> the fate of human dignity is in our hands. blood has been spilt to afford us this moment now, now, now! >> we are guaranteed to lose the whole thing. >> leave the constitution alone! >> you insult god. >> you think they'll keep their promise? >> i am the president of the united states of america. clothed in immense power. >> the movie and its performers are remarkable, but much of the film's power, its eloquence and percepti perception, its observation on the unchanging nature of governan
CSPAN
Dec 17, 2012 1:00am EST
of in distinct, and that even as late as the election of 1860, although lincoln and the republican party tried to make a case for sectionalism, it's a political construction and reflection of direct reality. >> host: well, we talk a lot today about red states and blue states, but there are a lot of conservatives in california and a lot of liberals in texas. >> guest: absolutely. >> host: was the it the same with slavery? was there a lot of sympathy to the institution of slavery in the north? >> guest: i think more to the point that the democratic party was probably, up to the election of 1860, during the period of popular elections for national office, was the majority party in the united states, and it was a party that was devoted to what we might call state rights and local control, and they put together a coalition that included slave holders in the south and a whole variety of people in the north including urban laborers who were pushing back against the potential promise of centralization of power. i think what is true is that state right sentiment was widespread. some sympathy for secess
PBS
Dec 1, 2012 12:00am PST
, we take an encore look at president abraham lincoln and his evolving legacy in politics and culture. earlier this year, hari sreenivasan toured the ford's theatre center for education and leadership in washington, d.c., with historian richard norton smith. >> sreenivasan: walking into the theater center is like taking a step back in time to the cobblestone streets of washington on april 16, 1855, the day after president abraham lincoln's death. newspaper headlines cover the walls of the new exhibit which ...in a building across the street from ford's theater where the president was assassinated. >> you walk to the third floor and you come to this mothy attic. the chronological treatment. >> reporter: presidential historian richard norton smith, who helped design the center, says its mission is to examine how lincoln has influenced americans great and small since his death. in part, that influence is symbolized by the 34-foot-high book tower that connects the center's three floors. it's made of aluminum and represents some of the roughly 15,000 works written about lincoln. >> the sto
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 1:00pm EST
, and even as late as the election of 1860i think lincoln very powerfully the republican party very powerful we tried to the case for sectionalism. i think it is more of a political construction and reflection of the reality. >> we talk a lot today about the red states and blue states but there are a lot of conservatives in california and a lot of -- was it the same with slavery? was there a lot of sympathy? >> i cut its more to the point that the democratic party was probably up to the election of 1860 during the period of popular e elections for the national office with the majority party in the united states. and there was a party the was devoted to what we might call state rights and local control and we put together a coalition that included the slaveholders in the south, and a whole variety of people in the north including urban laborers and they were pushing back against the potential promise of the centralization of power. i think that is true that state rights or spread. some think the secessionism was sufficiently widespread that the lincoln administration is really worried about i
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 11:00pm EST
lincoln and henry clay played in the national debate. this is about an hour. [applause] .. >> what i would like to talk to you about today is my most recent book, "a wicked war: polk, clay, lincoln, and the 1946 u.s. invasion of mexico." the title, "a wicked war", is taken from a quote from ulysses s. grant. from late in his life, grant look back on his career and in his memoir he writes about the experiences that he had, good and the bad. it makes for good reading. one thing that grant spent some time talking about leaving his wife with his role in the us-mexico border of 1986 -- 1846. >> i found is a very moving quote. the fact of the matter is that grant was not alone in thinking that the u.s. invasion of mexico was somehow with it. one thing that i talk about in this book and i will talk about tonight is the evolution of the american public during the course of the u.s. and mexico war, from being really enthusiastic to largely turning against the war. i think the u.s. and mexico war of the moment of america's first antiwar movement actually coming into being. so there was antiwar senti
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 11:00pm EST
of knowledge on lincoln or george washington? pretty much everything that could be written about linking -- lincoln or washington probably has been written. the rate historians whose figures point to pouring through the letters and the evidence of a book on i can or the hundreds of books on washington. my thought was, why not look at that person in it than the best, the first ladies? historians have largely ignored the role of the first lady as they have largely ignored the role of -- in shaping the man. i suspect a lot of my colleagues tend to be older men, educated in a certain way that didn't study such matters and most historians most historians is that we say were not educated in matters of the heart. so therefore canon's crowns and kings are what folks focus on. in setting the first lady's for example the first thing thomas jefferson did after spending 17 days on the south side of philadelphia writing the declaration of independence, the first thing he did was he went shopping for martha, his wife. he missed her. she was pregnant and she had a miscarriage. he missed her and he boug
PBS
Dec 3, 2012 4:30pm PST
off a new lincoln, taking the brand back to its heritage, but will a re-branding help rev-up sales, we ask ford c.e.o. alan mulally. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! after a weekend of trading accusations over the lack of progress on avoiding the fiscal cliff, both sides now have put their opening offers on the table. last week, it was treasury secretary timothy geithner meeting with top republicans. this afternoon, house speaker john boehner sketched out the g.o.p. proposal in a letter to the white house, and the proposal borrows suggestions from the president's own debt reduction commission, whose plan was ignored last year. the republican letter offered $900 billion in spending cuts from program reforms to medicare and social security. the g.o.p. plan would raise $800 billion in revenues by closing loop-holes and reforming the tax code, but stops short of specifics. noticeably missing: the higher taxes on high-wage earners which president obama has insisted on. the white house responded, saying "the g.o.p. proposal does not meet the test of balance. in fact, it actually pr
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 7:45am EST
the other things that were going on, the realization that lincoln had promulgated -- [inaudible] the union had commenced -- the tennessee cumberland and mississippi rivers seems to belong to the north, not the south. and i must've seen for a time in 1862 that the combination of events, particularly the successes of the union were about to end the war between the states. and then the trend line shifts. being the father of water that lincoln was now became vexed all over again. jim talent start with you. what happened and why? >> well, the union navy was on a roll in the fall and winter of 61 and 62, in the spring of 62. and it looked like they were going to open up the mississippi river quickly in the summer of 1862. vicksburg was really the only confederate bastion still on the mississippi river and both the seagoing fleet under now admiral farragut came all the way up through the gulf of mexico to vicksburg. the so-called western flotilla of river gunboats, had talked his way down the mississippi capturing them on the way. they combined to mark martin vicksburg but it was clear that the c
CBS
Dec 2, 2012 6:00am PST
want to know? ahead on sunday morning. >> osgood: lincoln is a name with a respected place in our national heritage. not the lincoln who served in the white house. we mean the lincoln that's been parked in many an upscale garage. now with other lucks you're eep brands having passed it by, reliable old lincoln is getting a relaunch. deny reynolds will go out and kick the tires. ♪ i like a new lincoln ♪ with all of its class >> reporter: it was for heads of state and hollywood heavyweigh heavyweights. in its heyday, to own a lincoln meant one thing: you had made it. but that was a long time ago. >> we took our foot off the accelerator, which happens sometimes. you know, that's that and today is today. >> reporter: lincoln's long road back to the top later on sunday morning. >> osgood: when we speak of raising the bar this morning, it's a specific chocolate bar we're talking about. a gourmet confection that is hoping to improve lives overseas thanks to one of hollywood's big stars. our seth doane went along. >> reporter: the slimy seeds inside these cocoa pods will be transformed
MSNBC
Dec 31, 2012 6:00am PST
learn from abraham lincoln? >> one of the things that you learn having now been in this office for four years is, you know, the old adage of abraham lincoln's, that with public opinion there's nothing you can't do, and without public opinion, there's very little you can get done in this town. atchee worked for us. we don't argue much. we really don't. meg usually just gets her way, and i go along with it. i think it worked for matt because i did it for him. when i'm the one cooking, i'm the one calculating the points. i can microwave things. you get to eat real food. we still get to go out. we're just so much smarter about it. we can keep each other in check. going, "okay, i see you." we've lost about 110 pounds together. it helped our love life. happy wife, happy life, right? right. [ jennifer ] weight watchers online. the power of weight watchers completely online. join for free today. the red cross was down here all the time. [ man ] they've given us a lot of heart. in times of need, they're there. ♪ [ kerry ] my dad was watching his house burn. he turned around, and all of a sudde
MSNBC
Dec 20, 2012 12:00am PST
douglas brinkley on barack obama, abraham lincoln, and spider-man. good to have you with us tonight, folks. thanks for watching. the president gave all americans a lot to work with today and a lot to think about in the coming weeks. president obama recognizes the mood of the country. there is a real sense of urgency to pass common sense safety laws in the wake of the newtown shooting massacre. the president knows this is going to be a heavy lift. >> that's why i've asked the vice president to lead an effort that includes members of my cabinet and outside organizations to come up with a set of concrete proposals no later than january, proposals that i then intend to push without delay. this is not some washington commission. this is not something where folks are going to be studying the issue for six months and publishing a report that gets read and then pushed aside. >> one of the reasons the president is asking for action without delay is because he knows change can be accomplished, and it's been done before. the assault weapons ban signed by president clinton reduced crime lower than it
MSNBC
Dec 12, 2012 7:00pm PST
in the rewrite, why abraham lincoln spoils the never raised taxes argument for republicans. that's coming up >>> what hillary clinton said tonight about running for president. >>> later, we will have a very special update about the kind fund. zeebox would be some sort of fancy, french mustard. just like adding fancy mustard to a hotdog makes you go "woah!," zeebox adds video, info, and playalongs to spice up your favorite shows. download zeebox free and say "woah" every time you watch tv. anyone have occasional constipation, diarrhea, gas, bloating? yeah. one phillips' colon health probiotic cap each day helps defend against these digestive issues with three strains of good bacteria. approved! [ phillips' lady ] live the regular life. phillips'. military families face, we understand. at usaa, we know military life is different. we've been there. that's why every bit of financial advice we offer is geared specifically to current and former military members and their families. [ laughs ] dad! dad! [ applause ] ♪ [ male announcer ] life brings obstacles. usaa brings advice. call or vi
MSNBC
Dec 12, 2012 10:00pm PST
, the tea party. later in the rewrite, why abraham lincoln spoils the never raised taxes argument for republicans. that's coming up >>> what hillary clinton said tonight about running for president. >>> later, we will have a very special update about the kind fund. >>> there aren't any taxes in if your tv were a space captain, zeebox would be an alien, first officer. just like an officer helps a captain explore the universe, zeebox helps you discover what shows are most popular, where the biggest buzz is, or what the stars are watching now. download zeebox free, and let your tv go where it's never gone before. download zeebox free, sfx- "sounds of african drum and flute" look who's back. again? it's embarrassing it's embarrassing! we can see you carl. we can totally see you. come on you're better than this...all that prowling around. yeah, you're the king of the jungle. have you thought about going vegan carl? hahaha!! you know folks who save hundreds of dollars by switching to geico sure are happy. how happy are they jimmy? happier than antelope with night-vision goggles. nice! g
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 12:00pm EST
to be here at the abraham lincoln presidential center. i have seen the benito juarez exhibit, which i encourage all of you to go see. a very big event. it is it fantastic show and really the relationship is so intriguing. one of want to talk to you about today's my most recent book in the invasion of mexico. the title is taken from my "from ulysses s. grant. from where it is live he looked back on everything that he had done in his career and in his memoirs he writes frankly about the experiences he has had the good and bad. it makes for really good reading, but one thing the crack spent some time thinking and talking about late in life was his role in the u.s.-mexico border of 1846. grant said at the time i do not think there was ever more wicked were then that waged by the united states of mexico. i thought so at the time when i was the dexter, only i had not moral courage enough to resign. during the time of the u.s.-mexico war, i just found this are really moving "which is why it took it for my title. the fact of the matter is grant was not alone in thinking that the u.s. invasion
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 9:00am EST
lincoln and henry clay played in the debate. this is about an hour. [applause] the mac thinks, to nice. i want to thank everybody who's so nice to meet here at the abraham presidential center. i've got me to her and seeing that they need to worry stewart. i encourage you to see when there's not some event like there is right now. the relationship between war as in the lincoln is really intriguing. i want to talk about today is my most recent book, "a wicked war: polk, clay, lincoln, and the 1846 u.s. invasion of mexico." the title dream to is taken from a quote from ulysses s. grant. from the thinnest i've come across back in everything he did then in his career and this number as he writes frankly about experiences he's had, the good in the bad and it makes for good reading. but one thing that grant spent some time together talking about in his life was his role in the u.s.-mexico war of 1846. grant said at the time, i do not think there is a more wicked words and outraged by the united states and mexico. so at the time when as a youngster, only he had not wrote urging us to resign and g
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 4:00pm EST
to the lincoln memorial. we just lost our picture. there we go. and they are there, of course, for the inauguration. people gathered to watch in other places as well. in times square in new york city, classrooms around the country, paris, barack, afghanistan, people are watching the u.s. presidential inauguration. they have all come there. there is a big crowd of a mall. of going to speak to you today about this great historic subject to my great american institution the end of not -- i'm going to do it in the same way in which i organize the book rather, the book is not chronological, it's not divided up. this touch of a george washington in mid john adams and went to the president in order. instead is divided up by the various parts of the day. within each part of the day i sprinkle in vignettes. some of them very serious, some of them, of course, very traditional command a lot of them on all events because i'm always looking for those, too. i'm also going to cover some things that were not going tessie in the upcoming in a garish in january because this time we don't have a
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 10:00am EST
states with michael kazin. >> tonight i am going to us discuss abraham lincoln's role in the crisis of the union, 1860-61. more specifically will talk about however him again rejected any meaningful compromise. the country was gripped by a section of crisis because many southerners feared lincoln and his republican party. it was a north party and proudly so. it did not have a significant seven connection. lincoln was elected without a single lessor although for many of the 15 / states and only four of the border states did he get any popular votes and then nearly a handful. for the first time in the nation's history there will be taking over the executive branch of the national government. the republican party was proudly in northern party, during its brief existence in the mid 1850's damage its rhetoric and assault of the south, and the south major social institution racial slavery. and their determination that is the republicans' determination to well the north into a unit that could win a national election without any southern support, the republicans repeatedly condemned the sou
MSNBC
Dec 31, 2012 2:30am PST
. president obama abraham lincoln's order that declared slaves in this country forever free. the document is once again on display. ron mott has details. >> reporter: showing its age the emancipation proclamation still draws attention. a document whose aim was to you night a country divided by war. >> it's amazing to see abraham lincoln's signature. >> reporter: today the frail order consigned to history on january 1st, 1863 by abraham lincoln is again on public display. show% time just a few days every year. >> very uplifting experience. very important document. >> reporter: presidential historian doris goodwin on president lincoln freeing the slaves. >> philosophically lincoln always believed slavery was wrong. there's no question about that from the time he was a young man. the question is what power did he, once he became president, have to do something about ending slavery? he finally found that door with his powers as commander-in-chief and with military necessity and then he went through that door. >> reporter: the proclamation and the union admitting blacks to its fighting ranks h
FOX
Dec 28, 2012 4:30am PST
bmw in the road there and in the distance there a black lincoln. that bmw smashed into that lincoln killing one of the persons inside that vehicle and then tried to run from the copping. california highway patrol tells us this started as a regular pull over. as a stop for speeding. the driver had been spotted speeding but the chp had the car pulled over at 90th. the officers got back into their patrol car and began following the bmw. they lost sight of that car momentarily. when they came over the hill here they came upon this deadly crash. the entire incident took place in a minute or so. the bmwt-boned the lincoln killing one woman inside. >> the bmw collided into a black lincoln. the driver of the bmw jumped z out of the car and began running along with its passenger. >> reporter: they eventualize caught that driver and were able to make a good id because they got a good look at him after they pulled over that bmw. at this point there is no signs of that passenger. i talked to chp earlier this morning. they are interviewing that driver to find out who that passenger was. trying t
NBC
Dec 29, 2012 11:00pm EST
in history. >> the emancipation proclamation signed by president lincoln on january 1, 1863. is 150 years old on newsday. to celebrate it is making a rare public appearance sunday through tuesday at the national archives. >> when you can see it up front and see lincoln's signature and all the other provisions of the document, it brings the document to life. >> it declared that all slaves in states rebeling against the union were to be forever free. but it did not immediately and slavery. president lincoln did not have the power to enforce it in areas under confederate control. >> to afford us this moment, now, now. >> what the document did do was become a symbol of hope for 4 million slaves and change the character of the war. >> it was important. it was a military measure. lincoln did not do this for humanitarian reasons. he did it because he was able to, as a consequence of being commander in chief. >> this is the official document with the u.s. seal and lincoln's signature. it is really made accessible, having been damage decades ago by light exposure. conservatives rotate which of the fiv
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 8:45pm EST
of the realization that lincoln had actually promulgated an emancipation proclaimation. the blockade was in force in confederate ports. the union had chanced the bombardment of the city of vicksburg, and new orleans had fallen. the tennessee, cumberland, and mississippi rivers seem to belong the north, not the south. and it must have seemed for a time in 1862 that this combination of events, particularly the naval successes for the union, were about to end the war between the states. and then the trend line changed. the father of water that lincoln boasted now flowed unvexed to the sea, became vexed all over again. so jim, let's start with you. what happened and why? >> well, the union navy was on a roll in the fall and winter of '61 and '62 and the spring of 1862. and it looked like they were going to open up the mississippi river completely in the summer of 1862. vicksburg was really the only confederate bastion still on the mississippi river, and both the sea-going fleet under, now-admiral david farrogot came up from the gulf of mexico to vicksburg and the so-called we were flotilla of river b
ABC
Dec 28, 2012 11:00am PST
be facing serious charges for hitting a lincoln that had five inside, one person was killed. chp officers say the driver of this bmw stopped when they pulled him over. as they walked up to his car, he took off and caused a fatal car accident. they don't know why. >> does not appear to be that the bmw was stolen. we are still trying to determine the driver of the bmw fled the scene. >> reporter: he crashed into a lincoln carrying five people. a woman in her 20s was killed. two others were taken to the hospital with serious injuries. >> they were minding their own business and unfortunately in the wrong place at the wrong time, as bet we can tell there was no criminal activity involve -- as best we can tell there was no criminal activity involved in their behave. >> reporter: as they tried to turn left on to 580 the bmw was driving north and hit the lincoln. this wasn't a high speed chase it didn't last long enough. >> it took place in a minute's time span officers first contact 11:20 they came over the crest of the hill and saw the collision at 11:21. this drier got out of sight o
KOFY
Dec 28, 2012 11:30am PST
a lincoln that had five inside, one person was killed. chp officers say the driver of this bmw stopped when they pulled him over. as they walked up to his car, he took off and caused a fatal car accident. they don't know why. >> does not appear to be that the bmw was stolen. we are still trying to determine the driver of the bmw fled the scene. >> reporter: he crashed into a lincoln carrying five people. a woman in her 20s was killed. two others were taken to the hospital with serious injuries. >> they were minding their own business and unfortunately in the wrong place at the wrong time, as bet we can tell there was no criminal activity involve -- as best we can tell there was no criminal activity involved in their behave. >> reporter: as they tried to turn left on to 580 the bmw was driving north and hit the lincoln. this wasn't a high speed chase it didn't last long enough. >> it took place in a minute's time span officers first contact 11:20 they came over the crest of the hill and saw the collision at 11:21. this drier got out of sight of the officers as -- this driver got out of sight
MSNBC
Dec 31, 2012 2:00am PST
the emancipation proclamation still draws attention. >> it's amazing to see abraham lincoln's signature. >> reporter: today the frail order consigned to history on january 1st, 1863 by abraham lincoln is again on public display. showtime just a few days every year. >> very uplifting experience. very important document. >> reporter: presidential historian doris goodwin on president lincoln freeing the slaves. >> philosophically lincoln always believed slavery was wrong. the question is what power did he, once he became president, have to do something about ending slavery? he finally found that door with his powers as commander-in-chief and with military necessity and then he went through that door. >> reporter: the proclamation taken none admitting blacks to its fighting ranks helped tip the balance of the war towards the north weakening confederate forces and preserving the united states of america. many slaves of course went to their deaths never experiencing the freedoms espoused in the emancipation proclamation. some are buried here in the african-american national monument. as a maj
FOX
Dec 6, 2012 4:00am PST
, "skyfall" at $16 million, "rise of the guardians" at $13 million, "lincoln" at $13 million, and "life of pi" at $12 million. but brad pitt's movie came in at seventh place. > > the worst wide-release opening of brad pitt's career. but i don't think this is really a sign of brad pitt. i mean, audiences clearly didn't like the movie at all. they gave it an f cinemascore, which is very rare for a service company. but the weinstein co., for some reason, they kind of dumped this movie after cannes. they didn't put a lot of publicity into it, they kind of knew it wasn't an awards film. so they kind of just threw it out there, and obviously the box office reflected that. > "killing them softly" is doing just that. > > that's right. > i want to ask you about this: i feel like it is a little early to talk about oscar contenders, but i made it to a lot of these movies so far, i have to say: "argo", "lincoln." i now saw "silver linings." it is terrific. i loved "flight." i thought "arbitrage" was very good. what do the winners look like for you? > > i think there are probably three films right now tha
CBS
Dec 3, 2012 7:00am PST
"this morning." welcome back. the lincoln continental is one of the auto industry's legendary models but over the years lincoln customers got old and the carmaker went into a slump. >> that division of ford is going back to its original name. as ben tracey reports it's unveiling a new luxury sedan with a lot of riding on it. >> reporter: the 2014 ford fiesta. -- the l.a. auto show is perfect to relaunch a brand that's been branded as boring. this is the new lincoln mkz, the company is hoping it will make it less m.i.a. how tough of a sales pitch it is for these american automakers? >> real tough. >> reporter: automotive analyst john mcelroy said bmw and audi owns the luxury division that ford is trying to compete in. >> lincoln's ownership is dying off. they had cars that were designed for older people. >> reporter: in 1990 lincoln sold 200,000 vehicles. that dropped to just about 85,000 last year. but ford is reportedly giving lincoln a billion dollars to get it back on the right road. >> more than just a car. it really has to be an entirely new presentation of the lincoln brand. it
CBS
Dec 13, 2012 7:00am PST
by police in new mexico. >> the golden globe nominations just announced out in hollywood. "lincoln" leads with seven bids. >> i don't need to be schooled by you, okay. i've been in this business quite a long time. >> well, you just were. >> and all that matters. ♪ >> when the storm hit, we all knew that the healing process was going to begin, but it was going to take a long time. we are strong. we are new york, we are new jersey. >> let's go, i love you. >> on "cbs this morning." >> you can throw anything at us. we're coming back stronger any time. ♪ captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to "cbs this morning." norah o'donnell is off. it may be the holiday season, but when it comes to lawmakers in washington, it seems no one is in a giving mood. both sides are dug in and there's little sign of progress from the talks to avoid the fiscal cliff. with just 19 days to go, republican leaders telling members of congress not to make holiday travel plans. >>> and a new poll this morning suggests that most americans want to see a deal, but on the president's terms. the "wall street journal" nbc
MSNBC
Dec 25, 2012 5:00am PST
great president. because of his personality, he didn't have a war. when lincoln was a young man, he lamented the fact the rep re public had been formed, all the great guys were on mountains, rivers, and streams and his generation had no challenge. he's saying what's left for us? maybe a congress, a presidency without purpose. then of course the civil war comes along. i remember jfk saying at one time could i be a great president -- i don't remember but he is said to have said can i be a great president without a war? clinton wondered the same thing. a war can undo you as with lbj or it can offer you that chance to make the country come together. and in a certain sense, bush had that chance at 9/11. could he have summoned the country to greatness at that point, which did not happen. >> and evan, here's another example of dwight eisenhower possibly not getting his due because he avoided war. and one of the most extraordinary moments i think of his presidency was the suez crisis where everybody was ready to go to war and ike said, sit down. you're not going. >> war is a great temptatio
ABC
Dec 14, 2012 6:00am PST
at montevista high and also at lincoln elementary something that begin four miles from here in san jose. take a look at message that started this entire thing, at linbrook high school a spray-painted threat about a bomb and threat about a teacher. that threat led to santa clara county sheriff's deputies closing down montevista and lincoln elementary. bomb-sniffing dogs were called out. they checked out the campus. a room by room search went on. shortly after the 11:00, it was the all clear, just a hoax but the sheriff's office is also interested in protecting the teacher in case there might be some truth to this. >> a couple deputies are providing protection. >> it won't be a laughing matter if they find the persons that spray pained that message. that person or persons could be facing a felony. this morning, both monte vista high and lincoln elementary will be open for business but as i mentioned additional sheriff's deputies will be on campus just in case. terry mcsweeney, "abc 7 news." >>> fire investigators hope they can get their first look inside a gutted business to see what started a
NBC
Dec 30, 2012 9:00am EST
with the declaration of independence. >> the emancipation proclamation signed by president lincoln january 1, 1863. to celebrate, its making a rare public appearance sunday through tuesday at the national archives. >> when you can see lincoln's signature and all of the other provision of the document, it brings the document to life. >> it declared that all slaves in states rebelling against the union were to be forever free but didn't immediately end slavery. lincoln didn't have the power to enforce it in areas under confederate control. what the document did do was become a symbol of hope for nearly four million slaves and fundamentally changed the character of the war. >> it was important. it was a military measure. lincoln did not do this for humanitarian regions. reasons. he did it as a consequence of being commander-in-chief. >> this is the official document with the u.s. seal and lincoln's signature, setting it party from other copies and drafts. it's rarely been made accessible. having been badly damaged decades ago by light exposure. conservators rotate which pages are shown. >> our strate
NBC
Dec 30, 2012 6:30pm EST
of this country's most important documents, the emancipation proclamation, president abraham lincoln's order that declared slaves in this country forever free. the document is once again on display. and nbc's ron mott has more. >> reporter: though clearly showing its age, fading ink, a yellow patina, the emancipation proclamation still draws undivided attention 150 years later, a document whose aim was to unite a country divided by war. >> it's amazing to see abraham lincoln's signature. >> reporter: today at the national archives in washington you can the frail order consigned to history on january 1, 1863, by president abraham linkson again on public display. showtime, just a few days every year. >> very uplifting experience. it is a very important document. >> reporter: presidential historian doris kerns good win on president lincoln freeing the slaves in the rebel states to fight for their own freedom. >> philosophically i lincoln had always believed that slavery was wrong. there's no question about that, from the time he was a young man. the question was what power did he, once he becam
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